Diana Eisner, M.D.
The Physician

The Clinic

Insurance

Helpful Info

Helpful Information

Click on a link below to go there directly. Some of our information can be downloaded and printed from your computer in either Microsoft Word (click on ".doc", requires Microsoft Word or a similar product) or Adobe Acrobat formats (click on ".pdf", requires Adobe Reader which can be downloaded for free from here).

2009 School Year Vaccination Requirement Changes:
New Patients:
  • Be sure to review our accepted insurance list. If you have insurance, you must bring your insurance card or fax us a copy of both the front and back of your card at 713-688-0595.
  • Fill out our New Patient Packet (.pdf) and bring it with you or fax it to us ahead of your visit. Also bring or fax your child's current shot record.
  • Fill out our extended family history information .pdf / .doc
All Patients:

Office Visits and Procedures

Office Hours
Our office hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8:30 A.M. to 12 noon, and 2 P.M. to 5 P.M., and Thursday 8:30 A.M. to 12 noon. OUR OFFICE IS CLOSED ON THURSDAY AFTERNOON.

Phone Calls
  1. During Office Hours
    My staff is skilled at answering questions by phone, and will give assistance by telephone whenever possible, or schedule an appointment if needed.
  2. After Office Hours
    For emergencies after office hours, Dr. Eisner or another pediatrician delegated by Dr. Eisner may be reached by dialing our office number (713-688-8393) which will give a message to call our answering service number (281-856-4906) when our office is closed. If the emergency is such that it cannot wait for a return phone call, please call 911, or go directly to the emergency room at Texas Children's Hospital or Memorial Northwest Hospital. Also, keep the number of poison control handy (1-800-764-7661).

Office Policies and Procedures
In this era of "efficiency" and managed care, I make an effort not to run my practice like a factory. I try to be thorough; to answer questions completely, and not make patients and their parents feel rushed. Our office is generally able to separate sick and well children by moving children quickly out of the waiting room and into one of the exam rooms. We will always take care of an emergency as soon as possible on the day you call. Examples of pediatric medical emergencies are fevers of over 101 degrees in an infant under two months of age, or over 104 degrees in an older child. Our office tries to see your children in a timely fashion and avoid long waits. We will also try to help you out by phone when this is possible and appropriate.

The Friday/Holiday Rule
If your child is ill on a Friday or before a holiday, bring the child in to be seen. There are few things more miserable than spending a long weekend with a very sick child, and emergency rooms are best avoided unless there is a true emergency.

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Vaccines

Many of our young parents do not realize how lucky we are to live in an age where vaccines have virtually eradicated terrible diseases such as polio. They have not experienced the terror of a polio epidemic, or seen diseases such as measles, or mumps. But there are still people alive today who suffer from paralysis caused by polio, and deafness caused by mumps.

Our office follows established guidelines to ensure that your child is protected against disease in the safest way possible. I am frequently asked whether the vaccines in our office contain thimerol. The vaccines which we give that are required by the Texas Department of Health do not contain thimerosol as a preservative. (The influenza vaccine, which is optional, may contain thimerosol). As per experts. guidelines, our office now gives only the injectable and not the oral polio vaccine. With regard to newly introduced but not required vaccines, Dr. Eisner prefers to wait until their safety has been demonstrated by use in the community.

We are now on Texas Vaccines For Children which enables our office to administer vaccines for a nominal charge for children (18 years or under) whose vaccinations are not covered by insurance.

Our office recommends that Tylenol/acetaminophen be given just before the vaccines, and four hours later, in order to minimize mild reactions such as fever which may be caused by the vaccines. We ask that parents not bring their child in for vaccines when they are sick. We also ask that parents let us know if their child has an allergy to eggs or gelatin, or if any siblings have had a serious reaction to any injection. And if your child does have any reaction that concerns you, we ask that you contact our office right away. If there is an emergency, please do what you should do in any true emergency . call 911, or go directly to Texas Children's Hospital.

The common side effects of many vaccines are fever, irritability, local soreness at the injection site, or increased sleeping. These are usually self-limited, and may last form several hours to a couple of days.

You can download our vaccine flow sheet/schedule here: .pdf

Our vaccine schedule may change because of changes in vaccine recommendations and requirements, as well as the development of shots which combine more vaccines - allowing us to give your child fewer shots. Certain vaccines, including DTap, IPV, HIB and Prevnar, require fewer vaccines if the series is started significantly later than the recommended age. There is a lot of latitude in the timing for certain vaccines. For example, the 3rd IPV is recommended between age 6 and 18 months of age. For more information on vaccines of vaccine schedules, you may go to our vaccine library, or to the following website: http://www.cdc.gov/nip .

Our office will provide you with current vaccine records when your child gets his/her check-ups. We ask that you keep these records with your important papers, so that you can readily provide copies (or copy them onto certain forms) for daycare, camp, school and college. Make this part of your child.s PHR (Personal Health Record).

As with all non-urgent paperwork (including referrals), we ask that you give our office a minimum of 48 hours advance notice should you need additional copies at times other than a routine office visit. Back to Top



Fever Control

What is a Fever?

      Fever is not a disease. It is a symptom of an underlying problem. What the illness is and how serious it is depends on the other symptoms and how s/he looks after the temperature is brought down. High fever below l06 F does not cause brain damage, but it can lead to other problems such as convulsions if not watched closely and treated. Younger children under 4 years old tend to have higher fevers when ill. Fever usually goes up at night.

Treatment

      Getting the temperature down helps the child feel and look better. It is worth treating a fever over l00 F, particularly if your child tends to run high fever, or has a history of febrile convulsions.

  1. Fever medications are very helpful, but remember they may take 45 minutes to take effect. There are Tylenol and Motrin dosage charts below. Tylenol and Motrin doses may be staggered, as long as Tylenol doses are at least four hours apart, and Motrin doses are at least six hours apart. For example, Tylenol may be given at 2 p.m. and again at 6 p.m. if necessary. If fever is still high, Motrin could be given at 4 p.m. and 10 p.m.

  2. Keep the child lightly dressed. Bundling does not break a fever. Keep the room at a comfortable temperature. (Approximately 70 F.)

  3. Give your child cool liquids or popsicles.

  4. Sponging can be very helpful, but may be reserved for temperature over 103 F. Completely undress the child and place the child on a towel. Thoroughly wet the child's hair and body with cool water, then sponge the child with cool water especially under the arms and the inner thighs. Sponging is much better than just sitting in the water, since the sponging results in much more evaporation and heat loss. Continue for 20 to 30 minutes, and then re-check child's temperature. Use cool water for sponging, but do not use ice or very cold water.

  5. Suppositories for fever can be very useful if your child is vomiting and cannot hold down oral fever medications. Suppositories of Tylenol go under the names of Acetominophen and FeverAll, and are available over the counter. See dosing sheet below.


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When to Bring Your Child in to the Office

A child with a fever over 101 F. should be seen in the office. I feel particularly strongly about this if it is a young child/infant who can not communicate what's wrong, or if it is on a Friday or the day prior to a holiday. If your child's fever is high at night, and lower the next morning, bring your child in to the office. The fever will most likely go up again that night. Your child is not well until at least 24 hours fever free.

It is better to treat a child early than late and your child will respond much more quickly to an infection that is detected and treated early. prefer that I treat your child for an upper respiratory infection or a mild ear

When to Call After Hours

If an emergency occurs, please do not hesitate to call me or take your child to the emergency room at Texas Children's Hospital. The address is 6621 Fannin, located at the corner of Fannin and Holcombe.

Examples of When to go to the Emergency Room

  1. A child with a fever over 105 F. rectally.

  2. A child who is very lethargic and looks extremely sick after the fever has been brought down. Children with high fevers often look very sick just because of the high fever, but look much better after the fever is brought down.

  3. An infant under two months of age with a fever of 101 F. rectally.

  4. Seizure or convulsion.

  5. Difficulty breathing.


However, I do ask your consideration by treating non-emergencies and fevers yourself until you can call the office to make an appointment to have your child seen. The reason for the appointment would be to determine and treat the fever for the appropriate illness. When I am called at 2 a.m. about a child with a fever who is feeding well and fairly playful, all I can recommend is to give Tylenol, sponge bathe, and bring the child to the office the morning, after calling the office at 8:30 a.m. to make an appointment.

How to Take a Temperature

  1. Mercury Thermometer
    1. Rectal
    2. Oral
    3. Axillary
  2. Thermoscan
  3. Digital Thermometer
    1. Rectal
    2. Oral
    3. Axillary

The rectal temperature is the most accurate method. However you take your child's temperature, just state the method and the temperature reading you obtained.

If you are not sure how to take a temperature or read a thermometer, be sure to have one of my staff members or another experienced person show you. Practice before your child becomes ill. Oral temperatures are usually not accurate before the age of 4. Be sure you use the correct thermometer for taking your child's temperature. Rectal thermometers have a thicker bulb for safety. If the thermometer breaks in usage, you should be more concerned about the broken glass rather than the mercury. The mercury in the thermometer is in an inert form and is unlikely to cause any problems.

Taking the Rectal Temperature -- Mercury
  1. Shake the thermometer down to below 97 F. (36 C.)
  2. Lubricate with vaseline.
  3. Gently insert the thermometer into the rectum 1 to 2 inches.
  4. Leave it in two minutes.
  5. Do not leave your child alone with the thermometer inserted.
  6. Read it by turning the sharp edge of the triangle toward you, and turn it back and forth slightly until you can see the end of the silver column.
Taking an Oral Temperature -- Mercury
  1. Shake the thermometer down to below 97 F.
  2. Gently place the thermometer under your child's tongue.
  3. The child must keep the thermometer under the tongue for 3 minutes.
  4. The child must be able to keep the mouth closed or the reading will not be accurate.
  5. Do not leave your child alone with the thermometer in their mouth.
  6. Read it by turning the sharp edge of the triangle toward you, and turn it back and forth slightly until you can see the end of the silver column.
Taking an Axillary Temperature -- Mercury
  1. Please note this is considered the least accurate method.
  2. Shake the oral thermometer down to below 97 F.
  3. Gently place the thermometer under the child's arm.
  4. The thermometer must stay under the arm for at least five minutes.
  5. Do not leave your child alone with the thermometer under their arm.
  6. Read it by turning the sharp edge of the triangle toward you, and turn it back and forth slightly until you see the end of the silver column.
Taking a Thermoscan Temperature
  1. Please read the directions on how to use your thermoscan.
  2. The thermoscan measures the temperature of the eardrum.
  3. Please place the thermoscan in the rectal mode setting.
  4. Replace the batteries often.
  5. If you are unsure of the reading you get, I suggest you take your own temperature using the thermoscan.
Taking a Digital Temperature -- Rectal, Oral, or Axillary
  1. Please read the directions on how to use your digital thermometer.
  2. Replace the batteries often.
  3. If you are unsure of the reading I suggest you take your own temperature using this digital thermometer.
Temperature Equivalents -- Fahrenheit (F degree) vs. Centigrade (C degree)

FahrenheitCentigrade
98.637
10037.8
100.438
101.338.5
102.239
10440
10540.5
10641

Please note on the Fahrenheit thermometer, each line is 0.2.
On the Centigrade thermometer, each line is 0.1.

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Tylenol Dosage Chart for Fever
Important Dosing and Measurement Information
  1. One teaspoon (tsp.) is the same as 5ml or 5cc. One tablespoon (Tbsp.) is the same as 15 ml, or 15 cc.

  2. Tylenol drops and liquid (elixir) have different concentrations, and hence very different dosing schedules. For example tsp. or 2.5 ml of Tylenol liquid does not equal to 2.5 ml of Tylenol drops. See dosing sheets below.

  3. Suppositories for fever usually come in 1 grains or 80 mg., 2 grains or 120 mg., 5 grains or 325 mg. See dosing sheet below for your child'scorrect dosage.

The oral products may go by the names of Tylenol, Tempra, Acetominophen.
The suppositories may go by the names of Tylenol, Feverall, or Acetominophen.
They are all acetominophen type fever reducer medications.

Oral Fever Medication Dosages
WeightDropsElixirChewable TabletJunior StrengthAdult Strength
80mg/.8mL160mg/5mL
160mg/1tsp
80mg/tab160mg/cap325mg/tab
6-11 lbs0.4 mL tsp 
12-17 lbs0.8 mL tsp1 tab
18-23 lbs1.2 mL tsp1 tab
24-35 lbs1.6 mL1 tsp2 tabs1 cab
36-47 lbs2.4 mL1 tsps3 tabs1 caps 
48-59 lbs3.2 mL2 tsps4 tabs2 caps1 tab
60-71 lbs4.0 mL2 tsps5 tabs2 caps
72-95 lbs4.8 mL3 tsps6 tabs3 caps
Over 96 lbs 4 tsps8 tabs4 caps2 tabs

Fever Suppository Medication Dosages
WeightInfantChildrenJr. Strength
80mg/each120mg/each325mg/each
6-11 lbs
12-17 lbs1 supp.
18-23 lbs1 supp. 
24-35 lbs2 supp.1 supp.
36-47 lbs3 supp.2 supp.
48-59 lbs  
60-71 lbs3 supp.1 supp.
72-95 lbs
Over 96 lbs2 supp.


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Motrin Dosage Chart for Fever

Important Dosing and Measurement Information
  1. One teaspoon (tsp.) is the same as 5ml or 5cc. One tablespoon (Tbsp.) is the same as 15 ml, or 15 cc.

The oral products may go by the name of Motrin, Advil or Ibuprofen.

Oral Motrin Dosages
WeightDropsSuspensionSuspensionCapletsCaplets
50mg/.8mL100mg/1 tsp
Under 102.5
100mg/1 tsp
Over 102.5
100mg/1 cap
Under 102.5
100mg/1 cap
Over 102.5
12-17 lbs  tsp. tsp 
18-23 lbs tsp.1 tsp.
24-35 lbs tsp.1 tsps.
36-47 lbs1 tsp.2 tsps.1 caps.2 caps.
48-59 lbs1 tsp.2 tsps.2 caps
60-71 lbs1 tsp.3 tsps.1 caps3 caps
72-95 lbs2 tsps4 tsps2 caps4 caps


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Newborn Care Items to Have On Hand

  • DIAPER BAG
  • DIAPERS
  • DIAPER RASH OINTMENT (DESITIN/OR DR. SMITH'S)
  • ALCOHOL AND/OR ALCOHOL SWABS
  • COTTON BALLS
  • COTTON Q-TIPS
  • BABY WASH
  • BABY OIL
  • BABY LOTION AND/OR BABY CREAM
  • COMB AND BRUSH
  • WASH CLOTH
  • BABY TOWEL
  • INFANT WASH TUB
  • NAIL CLIPPERS
  • VASELINE
  • GAUZE IF BABY BOY WITH CIRCUMCISION
  • BABY ROOM MONITOR
  • BABY CRIB AND/OR BASSINET (CHECK SAFETY INFORMATION)
  • CAR SEAT FOR NEWBORN TO TWENTY POUNDS (BE SURE IT FITS YOUR CAR CORRECTLY)
  • HUMIDIFIER AND/OR VAPORIZER (SOME MODELS CAN BE CHANGED WITH A SWITCH)
  • TEE-SHIRTS
  • SLEEPERS
  • BOOTIES AND/OR SOCKS
  • RECEIVING BLANKETS
  • HAT (ESPECIALLY IN WINTER)
  • NASAL SUCTION BULB
  • RECTAL THERMOMETER
  • PEDILYTE
  • TYLENOL INFANT DROPS
  • SMALL BOTTLE OF DISTILLED DRINKING WATER
  • NEOSPORIN OINTMENT
  • BAND-AIDS
  • SALINE NOSE DROPS
  • PACIFIER
  • BIBS
  • PLASTIC BAGS TO DISPOSE DIRTY DIAPERS
  • 2-3 INFANT TOYS IN DIAPER BAG AND/OR A FEW BOOKS
  • POSSIBLY BREAST PUMP IF BREAST FEEDING
  • BABY BOTTLE (THE ANGLED STYLE OR PLATEX NURSERS)
  • CONSIDER HAVING ON HAND ONE CAN OF FORMULA AND/OR A BOTTLE OF EXPRESSED BREAST MILK ON HAND FOR EMERGENCIES FORMULA-EITHER SIMILAC® LOW IRON (MILK BASED) OR ISOMIL® (SOY)
Be sure to wash ALL blankets, sheets and clothing items before putting them on the baby. Use Dreft or Ivory Snow and please double rinse to remove any soapy residue. Also remember that YOUR clothes may rub on the baby and will need to be well-washed and rinsed too. Cologne and perfumes may also cause rashes. When trying any new clothing, bedding, cleaners, or other items, please watch your baby carefully for any rashes that may develop.

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Jaundice in the Newborn

(Excerpt from the Newborn Care Instructions document)

Jaundice is a yellowish coloration of the skin and eyes caused by the pigment "bilirubin". The most common cause of jaundice is "physiologic". That is, it is due to the particular characteristics of the physiology of infants. Infants are born with a very high red blood cell count and these cells break down in the first weeks of life. One of the normal breakdown products is bilirubin. The job of the liver is to metabolize the bilirubin, but because the newborn liver is immature, it is often unable to handle the load, and therefore bilirubin builds up in the bloodstream.

Infants are not usually born with significant jaundice; this usually develops with time, and peaks at about the third to sixth day of life. Bilirubin levels on about half of normal newborn infants will get as high as 10 or more. A normal adult level of bilirubin is less than 1. Jaundice, or hyperbilirubinemia, is only dangerous at very high levels, at which point bilirubin could deposit in the brain and cause severe and irreversible brain damage (kernicterus). An infant with significant jaundice or hyperbilirubinemia will often be lethargic in addition to appearing yellow. The exact number value at which an infant will develop kernicterus is not known and may vary in different infants. It is now thought to be over 20 in healthy full-term infants. Treatment of hyperbilirubinemia consists of pushing fluids (either oral or intravenous), ultra-violet light (sunlight or manufactured) or in extreme cases, exchange (blood) transfusions.

Studies have shown that exclusively breast-fed infants will get significant jaundice more commonly than bottle-fed infants. This is probably because these infants take in much less fluid during the first few days of life. Mother's early milk, or colostrum, is rich in protein and good for the baby, but has been estimated at about 4-5 ounces per 24 hours for the first few days of life. Therefore, exclusively breast fed infants don't take in enough fluids to "flush the system" through urination and fecal elimination. In addition, there may be a factor in the breast milk per se that contributes to the jaundice. Because of this problem, I encourage breastfeeding mothers to supplement with formula until their milk comes in, so as to minimize this problem. After mother's milk comes in, she may exclusively breast feed if this is her preference. In my experience, this results in a much higher degree of success with breast feeding, as many mothers who encounter jaundice in their infants requiring home ultra-violet lights or re-hospitalization for their newborns give up on breast-feeding entirely.

Sometimes, breastfed infants will remain jaundiced for several weeks. Tests must be done to be sure that there is not some other cause for infant's jaundice, and to be sure as well that the bilirubin is not at a potentially dangerous level. Since there are many other less common causes of jaundice, such as blood group incompatibilities, infections, hypothyroidism, or inborn errors of metabolism, more extensive testing may be required if jaundice is unusually severe or prolonged.

You can view a chart of bilrubin and jaundice risk levels as well as a list of frequently asked questions in this .PDF file.

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Newborn Stool (Constipation/Diarrhea)

(Excerpt from the Newborn Care Instructions document)

Your baby may have a bowel movement after every feed or as infrequently as every 3 days and still be normal. However, it is desirable for your infant to have at least one bowel movement every day so as to expel fermenting fecal byproducts, thereby minimizing such problems as gas and spitting up. The consistency of infants' stools is very different from older children or adults. Usually, the bowel movements of bottle-fed infants look like scrambled eggs, and those of breast-fed infants are "soupy", and yellow or brown. Sometimes, infants. stools are green, and this does not mean anything terrible. The color of the stool in part reflects the transit time through the bowel. Green bile pigments are introduced high up in the bowel. With rapid transit time through the bowel, as is common in a newborn, or as with insults to the bowel such as diarrhea, bowel movements may remain green. With slower transit, the color of the bowel movement changes to yellow and then to brown.

A constipated infant will have infrequent, hard stools which may be in the form of small "pellets". Insertion of a lubricated thermometer or 1/2 of an infant glycerin suppository into the rectum will be helpful in the event of a difficult stool. Infant glycerin suppositories are available without a prescription. Sometimes, constipation problems necessitate a change in formula. In particular, sometimes iron-enriched formulas may result in constipation, and may need to be changed. One to four teaspoons of prune juice or 1 teaspoon of dark karo syrup per four ounces of formula, or 2-4 ounces of apple-prune juice may be very effective in treating constipation. There are also medications for treatment of constipation which are sold over the counter, such as maltsupex and senokot. Please call our office if your infant is having a problem with constipation. I may need to check your infant to rule-out the very uncommon anatomic causes of constipation such as anal stenosis or Hirschsprung's disease, and to recommend a plan of treatment.

Constipation is a common problem in infants. First, infants are like bedridden adults in that their mobility is low. Moving around stimulates bowel activity. Secondly, infant diets do not contain roughage. The Academy of Pediatrics recommends the introduction of solid foods at 4-6 months. Certain foods or dietary supplements may cause changes in the bowel movements, including changes in consistency, frequency, or color. For example, rice cereal, bananas, applesauce and iron tend to cause constipation, whereas prunes, plums, and green vegetables tend to have the opposite effect.

Occasionally after the passage of hard stools, bright red streaks of blood may be seen. This is generally due to slight rectal tearing and can be seen at the anal opening. Treatment involves "sitz baths" with baking soda, then gently applying A and D ointment to the anal area, as well as treating the underlying constipation problem. I would like to check your infant if this occurs, both to be sure that a fissure is indeed the source of the blood, and to reassure parents, since this is generally a frightening experience for most parents.

Diarrhea is more than loose stools; it is watery movements with little or no solid matter, and an increase in frequency. The danger of diarrhea, particularly in a tiny infant, is dehydration. Some signs or symptoms of dehydration are a sunken fontanel ("soft spot"), decreased urination, decreased skin turgor, weight loss, and listlessness. Please consult me if your infant has diarrhea since this may require attention.

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Home treatment of Vomiting and/or Diarrhea

Definition:

Vomiting and/or diarrhea may be induced by several different things; viral infections are the most common cause. Most vomiting stops within a few hours if some simple steps are followed early in the course. Dietary changes will usually hasten the recovery. If your child is under one year of age, it is not uncommon to regurgitate(spit up) occasionally. Regurgitation usually consists of 1-2 mouthfuls as opposed to the more forceful amounts that are characteristic of vomiting.

Treatment:

  • The purpose of dietary change (or more specifically, giving clear fluids) is to allow the stomach to rest.
  • Give one teaspoon (5ml) clear sweetened (NOT SUGAR-FREE) fluid every fifteen minutes for the first hour. This can be Jell-O water (one packet mixed with one quart of warm water), colas, gingerale, other soft drinks (stir to defizz), sweatened weak tea, or any clear fluid.
  • Advance to one tablespoon (15ml) of the above every fifteen minutes for one hour. Advance to small sips at frequent intervals over the next 3-6 hours.

If vomiting recurs at any time during the above plan, wait one hour, and then restart the regimen. Beginning with one teaspoon every fifteen minutes. If your child vomits again, call the office, as I shall want to discuss the individual case more thoroughly and perhaps proceed with additional treatment, such as a suppository, or we may need to see your child in the office. If your child goes to sleep during the above, continue the plan where you left off when he/she awakens.

After eight vomit/diarrhea free hours, gradually return to the normal diet:

  • INFANTS & TODDLERS:Applesauce, rice cereal, Jell-O, bananas, clear soups.
  • OLDER CHILDREN: Dry toast and honey, bland clear soups, applesauce, bananas, Jell-O and soda crackers.

REMEMBER, IT MAY TAKE TWO TO THREE DAYS TO TOTALLY RETURN TO A NORMAL DIET, SO DO NOT RUSH IT. CLEAR FLUIDS MEANS NO MILK!!!

If fever is present in addition to vomiting and/or diarrhea, an over the counter suppository for fever may be used. Follow the fever sheet instructions. If fever is greater than 102° during this period you may sponge bathe. Your child should be seen in our office for fever over 101°.

CALL THE OFFICE IF:

  • VOMITING PERSIST BEYOND TWO HOURS.
  • THERE IS BLOOD IN THE VOMITUS OR STOOL.
  • THERE IS ABDOMINAL PAIN MORE THAN TWO HOURS.
  • THERE IS ANY CHANCE OF POISONING (PLANT, MEDICINE, ETC.).
  • CHILD IS UNDER SIX MONTHS OF AGE.


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Treatment of Staph Aureus Infection

Shower with liquid Dial Antibacterial Soap daily for 1 to 2 months. DO NOT BATHE.

Shower using PhisoHex 2 times a week. Lather PhisoHex on all areas of skin, including scalp. (Being careful to avoid eye area) Leave lather on for 5-10 minutes and rinse.

Wash all towels, sheets, clothing etc. of the infected person separately after they have contact with those items.

Wear cotton underwear and change them frequently, and use a separate pair for day and night.

For 7 days treat entire family by putting Bactroban on a Q-tip and applying it to the inside of the nose twice daily.

1/8 cup household bleach to bathtub, soak for 15-20 min. 2 to 3 times per week.

NOTE:

  • Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis is an important predisposing factor for chronic colonization of the skin, and therefore recurring staph infections.
  • It may take as long as 1 year to totally get rid of the Staph on the skin, in someone who has eczema.
  • Oral antibiotics are required for major outbreaks.


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